2017 ANNUAL MEETING- KOSCISUKO OCTOBER 28, 2017

logo

The 2017 Natchez Trace Parkway Association Annual Meeting will be held in Kosciusko, MS (mile marker 160 on the parkway) on the Public Square at 4:00 p.m. in Barrister Hall.  The meeting will be held in conjunction with a full day of events hosted by the City of Kosciusko Tourism Board to commemorate the State of Mississippi Bicentennial.  Natchez Trace Parkway Association Living History will provide educational events for the day, and we will introduce a new program to mark the Old Natchez Trace.

Event highlights:

9:30 a.m. Grand Parade of Natchez Trace Characters.

                Ceremony to Mark the Old Natchez Trace at Red Bud Springs

9:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Living History, Period Music, Period Dance, Blacksmith, Period Cooking, Choctaw Dances, Choctaw Fry Bread, Re-creation of Choate’s Stand on the Old Trace.

4:00 p.m.  NTPA Business Meeting

5:00 p.m.  Hospitality and Dinner by the City of Kosciusko at Barrister’s Hall- (Ticketed event)

7:00 p.m.  Lantern Tour of Historic City Cemetery by the Historical Society.

Sunday, October 29

Period Worship Service

Check back for additional details or email us at info@natcheztrace.org

 

2016 ANNUAL MEETING- CELEBRATING THE CENTENNIAL

Natchez Trace Parkway Association

2016 Annual Meeting

 

CELEBRATING THE CENTENNIAL

OF  THE

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

Florence, Alabama

October 20-22

 

Thursday, October 20

3:00 Check in – Marriott Shoals

5:00 – BBQ buffet dinner:   Kennedy-Douglass Center for the Arts, 217 E. Tuscaloosa St., Florence, AL. (Cost $7 payable on site).

View historic photographic exhibit of our National Parks

7:00:  Celebration of the NPS Centennial with Theodore Roosevelt, a one-man show with James Foote,  who portrays the president at the TR New York Birthplace and  other locations.  Location:  The historic Shoals Theatre, 123 N. Seminary St., Florence, AL,  two blocks from Kennedy-Douglass (no charge, reserved seating for association attendees)

 

Friday, October 21

9:00 – Opening Welcome and Chapter Reports

9:15 – Welcome Center Development and New Projects

9:30 – Pew Charitable Trust

9:50 – Gary Holdiness Cycling Fund Safety Program

10:10 – Living History

10:30 – Outreach

10:45 – Trails, Trail Fit, Trail Volunteer Program

11:00 – Business Meeting: Dick Jordan

Approval of Financial Report

Approval of MINUTES

Elections

11:15 – Chickasaw Inkana Foundation and its new work in the Natchez

Trace Homeland,  Jacob Dawson, Inkana Foundation Development Director

11:45 – BREAK

12:00 – Luncheon:  ($15) Speaker, Natchez Trace Parkway Superintendent Mary Risser.  Purchase tickets at 1-888-356-8687.

1:30 – Free time in afternoon.  Visit the many sites in Florence at your leisure.  A Museum Pass is included in your welcome bag that allows you to visit the Florence Museums complimentary:  Frank Lloyd Wright’s Rosenbaum House, Historic Pope’s Tavern, Kennedy-Douglass Center for the Arts, W.C. Handy Home and Museum, the new Florence Indian Mound Museum (not officially open but you are welcome to go climb the mound and visit the inside though the exhibits are not yet completed)

5:00- Social Hour at the Florence Visitors Center

Dinner on your own

Enjoy music at the hotel or visit the annual Renaissance Festival in Florence.

Saturday, October 22                Explore the Park  (Exact Locations Subject to NPS Permit)

Check out of the hotel .

8:00  Cycling Safety and Bike Ride.  Colbert Ferry.

Leave 9:00 from hotel for tour of Tom Hendrix’s Wall – Tom Hendrix

10:30 – Nature Walk at Rock Spring and Birding – Led by Charles Rose

11:30 – Living History at Chief Colbert’s Ferry – Reenactment of Creek Removal Council with the Chickasaws and Choctaw House Dances

12:00 – Boxed Lunch Picnic ($10). Purchase tickets at the Annual Meeting.

 

 

 

NATCHEZ TRACE NATIONAL SCENIC TRAIL

 

The Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail has been designated 444 miles from Natchez to Nashville.  About 70 miles of the NTNST have been completed.  The national scenic trail is not the parkway highway.  It is a separate trail that parallels the parkway.  Portions of the trail are the old Natchez Trace.

Currently, completed sections of NTNST have been given their own designations.  Each has its own unique scenery and physical environment, from the soft soil and Spanish Moss near Natchez to the scenic hillside views in Tennessee.

427 to 407   Highland Rim Section.

The north trailhead is located at Garrison Creek, where the old Natchez Trace military highway dropped from the ridgetop to the valley below.  The first section rises 200 feet to produce one of the most strenuous climbs of the NTNST.  At the top, an overlook gives a view of the valley, where the old Natchez Trace Indian trail led by the late 1700’s fortification that gave Garrison Creek its name. The next 1.5 miles is a well-preserved section of the old Natchez Trace military highway.  The trail leads to the War of 1812 monument, memorializing soldiers who marched and died on the Natchez Trace during the War of 1812.  From there the trail leads to Burns Branch and on to the Tennessee Valley Divide, that once formed the border with the Chickasaw Nation and where President Jefferson’s soldiers camped when building the military highway.  The trail then heads south through the forest, giving the sense of being away from civilization, but in reality, the trail is rarely more than 25 yards from the parkway motor road.  The trail leads to a spectacular overlook at Water Valley and then to the section trail head at Duck River, near the Gordon House.

 

 

Re-enactor’s Schedule and Information- Natchez

               RECEPTION AND BALL

                                         honoring

                           GENERAL ANDREW JACKSON

 

 

WHEN: Saturday, April 25, 2015, 6:00PM – 9:00PM

 

WHERE: Historic Jefferson College

Washington, Mississippi Territory

 

SPONSORS: The Natchez Trace Parkway Association (NTPA)

Visit Natchez

Historic Jefferson College

 

BACKGROUND:

Following the Battle of New Orleans, January 8, 1815, and upon his return to Nashville, Tennessee, receptions and dances were held for General Andrew Jackson and his wife, Rachel Donelson Jackson.   One such gala event was held in Washington, MS, on April 24, 1815.

In commemoration of the Bicentennial of the War of 1812, the Natchez Trace Parkway Association (NTPA), www.natcheztrace.org , the nonprofit friends group to the National Parks Service, would like to partner with the City of Natchez, Natchez businesses, Visit Natchez, and Historic Jefferson College to offer a reenactment of this gala event for Natchez citizens.

The event at Historic Jefferson College will be the first of four events along the Natchez Trace Parkway from April – July, 2015, commemorating General Jackson’s triumphant return to Nashville.   The final event will occur at The Hermitage, home of Andrew Jackson, on July 3 & 4, 2015, ending the nationwide Bicentennial of the War of 1812.

The Natchez Trace Parkway Association is proud to bring to conclusion this American Bicentennial Event.   The City of Natchez has already played an important role in the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 through hosting the Natchez Trace Parkway Association’s “RETURN TO NASHVILLE, BECOMING OLD HICKORY” Living History Initiative in April, 2013

 

EVENT SCHEDULE

General Public

 

 

Friday, April 24, 2015

7:00AM – Reveille

9:00AM – Morning Colors

9:00AM – 12:00Noon – Educational Initiative for schools. Open to the public.

4:00 – 5:00PM – Parade through downtown: King’s Tavern to Bowie’s Tavern.

5:00 – 5:30PM – Address on the bluff to the citizens of Natchez – Gen. Jackson.

5:30 – 7:30PM – Re-enactors have dinner at local restaurants.

Saturday, April 25, 2015

7:00AM – Reveille

9:00 – Morning Colors

9:00AM – 4:00PM – Encampment open to the public.

Educational Stations, 9:00AM – 2:00PM

10:00 – 10:30AM – “Speech of an Indian” Presentation and book release by Chickasaw Elder, Robert Perry – West Wing Parlour. Book signing follows.

10:45AM – 12:00 noon – Panel discussion. Tony Turnbow, moderator, West Wing The Role of Adams & Jefferson Counties in the creation of a New American Spirit

12:00 – 1:00PM – lunch

1:00 – 3:00PM – Period Dance Lessons – West Wing Dining Hall

2:00 – 5:00PM – free time for re-enactors. Prepare for evening event.

5:30PM – Evening Colors – (Evening participants encouraged to attend)

6:00 – 7:00PM – Reception, heavy hors d’oeuvres

6:30PM – General Jackson, Rachel, & Andrew Jr. arrive by carriage. A brief speech

by General Jackson, followed by the invitation to dance.

7:00 – 9:00PM – Grand Ball

 

Sunday, April 26, 2015

7:00AM – Reveille

8:30 – 9:00AM. Period Worship Service. Open to the public

9:00AM – Retiring of Colors – Event Closes

 

 

THE GRAND BALL

Saturday, April 25, 2015

6:00 – 9:00PM

 

  • Upon arrival, guests will need to walk from the designated parking area to the West Wing. Golf cart transport will be available all evening for those needing assistance.
  • Soldiers will escort & assist guests.
  • Food and beverages will be available in the West Wing Parlour beginning at 6:00PM. Cash bar.
  • The Ball will be held in the West Wing Dining Hall or Refectory. Music will be provided by the Booneslick Strings from St. Charles, Missouri.   The dance will be called by Mr. Martin Aubuchon, of Dance Discovery/St. Louis, Missouri.
  • Andrew Jackson will be portrayed by Grant Hardin of Hampton, TN.
  • Rachel Jackson will be portrayed by mezzo-soprano, Lester Senter Wilson, who will perform for General Jackson during intermission.
  • The dances will be simple so that all guests will feel comfortable to participate.   Mr. Aubuchon and Ms. Jeanne Anderson will assist participants. Dance lessons will be held from 1:00 – 3:00PM on Saturday.
  • Cost – $40.00/person. Purchase tickets by contacting Visit Natchez at     601-446-6345 or 800-647-6724
  • Effort is being made to make this as period correct as possible. Please help in this effort.
  • Period dress is suggested, but not required of the general public.               DO NOT LET THAT KEEP YOU FROM COMING !!!

 

HOTEL ACCOMODATIONS

  • Those wishing to stay in a hotel will be responsible for making their own arrangements
  • HOST HOTEL – Vue Hotel & Restaurant. 130 John R. Junkin Dr.   Block of 20 rooms, discounted to $89.00 + tax/night. Vue is locally owned. Go to vuehotelandrestaurant.com and use Group Code 11116.   Or, call 601-442-9976 or 888-946-4727 and say you are with the event sponsored by the Natchez Trace Parkway Association.

CONTACTS

 

Bryant R. Boswell

Event Coordinator

Immediate Past President, Natchez Trace Parkway Association

601-845-7994 (H) 618-978-7317 (C)

mtcreeklodge@aol.com

 

Mr. Adam Gwin

Local Arrangements

President, South MS Chapter, Natchez Trace Parkway Association

601-807-4088 (C)

adam@gwinfinefurniture.com

“SPEECH OF AN INDIAN”

By

Robert Perry

 

Book Release – 10:00AM, Saturday, April 25, 2015

Historic Jefferson College

Washington, MS

SYNOPSIS FROM THE BACK BOOK COVER:   A storyteller carries a bag of memories and forever seeks new tales. Stories have lives, too. If someone doesn’t share the story, it dies. Unless, like in this case, at least some fragment of the narrative remains. Within these pages you will find the storyteller discovers a published 1824 speech that a 19-year old Chickasaw man gave at Jefferson College (MS) commencement about survival on the wild frontiers of America. The story, long dead, begged for life. Strange that the speaker and storyteller had the same surname and were Chickasaw.

The Chickasaw people were removed from Mississippi in 1837 to Indian Territory (Oklahoma). The author from Oklahoma knew about James Perry, who founded Perryville.   Yet to be discovered: Perryville would have been Perry Town except that James Perry knew that town existed near Natchez, MS. His descendants had come from there. Everywhere the author turned, some new exciting bit was added to the chronicle. Engulf yourself now in the pages of the full fascinating narrative that has been skillfully woven together.

Living History Information- Alabama

LIVING HISTORY INFORMATION- TUSCUMBIA, FLORENCE
April 11- THURSDAY EVENTS. Re-enactors camp on the Bluff in Sheffield.

6PM   Claunch Café in Spring Park.  Private meal served to re-enactors and event workers.  Meeting to check final details.

SATURDAY, June 6

  • 10 – 12 AM. Muscle Shoals City Hall, 2010 E. Avalon. War of 1812 Speakers.
  • Robert Perry, Chickasaw Elder with 1812 arrows, Lanny Perry on 1812 ancestors, Keith Willingham on firing 1812 rifle.

FRIDAY, June 12

  • 9-5 PM: Sheffield Encampment of Soldiers, Civilians and Indians. Welcome by Mayor Ian Sanford. Alabama Forestry Service will dedicate a sign on the historic site. Richard Sheridan tells the rich history of the area. Educational events to follow. Period Crafters on site. Concessions offered by Sheffield Parks & Recreation.
  • 2PM: Memorial honoring the War of 1812 Veterans on the front lawn of Colbert County Court House, Tuscumbia with the American Legion, re-enactor soldiers, Uriah Blue’s Indians and Freemen of Color. Recognize Student Essay Contest Winners.
  • 5PM: Texas Christian Univ. Professor Gene Smith will speak on the Freemen of Color Soldiers in the War of 1812.

SATURDAY, June 13 (Locust Hill available 9AM to 12 PM)

  • 10:00AM: Florence-Lauderdale Tourism and Visitor Center. Welcome by Florence Mayor Mickey Haddock and NTPA President Dick Jordan.
  • 10:30 – 12:00AM. General John Coffee speech. Native American Circle. Speakers: NTPA Bryant Boswell and Tony Turnbow.
  • 5:00 PM. Andrew Jackson arrives Locust by horse-drawn carriage.
  • 5:30-6 PM at Locust Hill. Welcome comments by Tuscumbia Mayor Pro-temp Mitchell. General Jackson speaks and dismisses troops.
  • 6PM: Doors open. Appetizers served. Music by Sinclair Strings.
  • 7-11PM: Dances begin called by Marty Aubuchon with music by the Booneslick Strings.

SUNDAY, 9AM June 14, Historic St. Johns Church, 300 N. Dixon St., Tuscumbia. Period 1812 church service by preacher Jeff Sinclair, music by Sinclair quartet Public invited.

FOR UPDATES, SEE FACEBOOK: Triumphant Return Celebrating a New American Spirit. www.NatchezTrace.org.

EVENT CONTACT LIST

  • Local Arrangements and Chairman, Alabama Chapter NTPA:   Annie Perry, 256-415-0700; annrunningwater@comcast.net
  • NTPA, AL History Committee: Angela Broyles, Lee Freeman. Contact: Angela Broyles, 256-762-7153, Broyles@gmail.com
  • NTPA, AL Education Committee: Dr. Gayle Satchel, Jennifer Berry, Bob Perry. Contact: Bob Perry, 918-500-3467, rperr1603@comcast.net
  • NTPA, Living History: Bryant Boswell, Tony Turnbow. For Soldiers, contact Bryant Boswell, 618-978-7317 and home: 601-845-7994, mtcreeklodge@aol.com. For Indians, contact either Annie or Bob Perry (see above).
  • Sheffield Encampment: Keith Willingham, 256-394-2807, UncleKeith@aol.com, Bryant Boswell, 618-978-7317.
  • Finances: Bob Perry, Angela Broyles, Bud Pride. Contact: Bob Perry: 918-500-3467.
  • Marketing: Susann Hamlin, ColbertTourism@comcast.net, 800-244-0783, 256-383-0783.

 

  • Sponsors:
  • Florence Lauderdale Tourism
  • Colbert County Tourism
  • Helen Keller Foundation
  • City of Tuscumbia
  • City of Sheffield—Encampment site
  • Sheffield Parks & Rec.—concessions, cleanup
  • Poarch Creek Band of Indians
  • Magnum Systems
  • Allen Heat & AC
  • Vulcan Materials
  • Valley Credit Union
  • Muscle Shoals National Heritage Assoc.
  • Bluewater Publications
  • City of Sheffield
  • City of Muscle Shoals
  • City of Florence
  • Chickasaw Foundation
  • Tuscumbia Utilities
  • Sheffield Utilities
  • O’Bryans Restaurant
  • of No. Alabama Film Studies

 

 

 

Living History Information- Natchez

RECEPTION AND BALL

honoring

GENERAL ANDREW JACKSON

 

 

WHEN: Saturday, April 25, 2015, 6:00PM – 9:00PM

 

WHERE: Historic Jefferson College

Washington, Mississippi Territory

 

SPONSORS: The Natchez Trace Parkway Association (NTPA)

Visit Natchez

Historic Jefferson College

 

BACKGROUND:

Following the Battle of New Orleans, January 8, 1815, and upon his return to Nashville, Tennessee, receptions and dances were held for General Andrew Jackson and his wife, Rachel Donelson Jackson.   One such gala event was held in Washington, MS, on April 24, 1815.

In commemoration of the Bicentennial of the War of 1812, the Natchez Trace Parkway Association (NTPA), www.natcheztrace.org , the nonprofit friends group to the National Parks Service, would like to partner with the City of Natchez, Natchez businesses, Visit Natchez, and Historic Jefferson College to offer a reenactment of this gala event for Natchez citizens.

The event at Historic Jefferson College will be the first of four events along the Natchez Trace Parkway from April – July, 2015, commemorating General Jackson’s triumphant return to Nashville.   The final event will occur at The Hermitage, home of Andrew Jackson, on July 3 & 4, 2015, ending the nationwide Bicentennial of the War of 1812.

The Natchez Trace Parkway Association is proud to bring to conclusion this American Bicentennial Event.   The City of Natchez has already played an important role in the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 through hosting the Natchez Trace Parkway Association’s “RETURN TO NASHVILLE, BECOMING OLD HICKORY” Living History Initiative in April, 2013

 

EVENT SCHEDULE

General Public

 

 

Friday, April 24, 2015

7:00AM – Reveille

9:00AM – Morning Colors

9:00AM – 12:00Noon – Educational Initiative for schools. Open to the public.

4:00 – 5:00PM – Parade through downtown: King’s Tavern to Bowie’s Tavern.

5:00 – 5:30PM – Address on the bluff to the citizens of Natchez – Gen. Jackson.

5:30 – 7:30PM – Re-enactors have dinner at local restaurants.

Saturday, April 25, 2015

7:00AM – Reveille

9:00 – Morning Colors

9:00AM – 4:00PM – Encampment open to the public.

Educational Stations, 9:00AM – 2:00PM

10:00 – 10:30AM – Speech of an Indian,  Presentation and book release by Chickasaw Elder, Robert Perry – West Wing Parlour. Book signing follows.

10:45AM – 12:00 noon – Panel discussion. Tony Turnbow, moderator, West Wing The Role of Adams & Jefferson Counties in the  War of 1812 and the Creation of a New American Spirit

–  Mimi Miller, Natchez Historic Foundation

-Lance Harris, Natchez Grand Village

-Jessica Crawford, Southeast Archaeological Association

– Lou Ritten, Author, Fort Adams

12:00 – 1:00PM – lunch

1:00 – 3:00PM – Period Dance Lessons – West Wing Dining Hall

2:00 – 5:00PM – free time for re-enactors. Prepare for evening event.

5:30PM – Evening Colors – (Evening participants encouraged to attend)

Bicentennial Re-creation of 1815 Natchez and Washington Victory Balls for General Jackson and the Soldiers

6:00 – 7:00PM – Reception, heavy hors d’oeuvres

6:30PM – General Jackson, Rachel, & Andrew Jr. arrive by carriage. A brief speech

by General Jackson, followed by the invitation to dance.

7:00 – 9:00PM – Grand Ball

 

Sunday, April 26, 2015

7:00AM – Reveille

8:30 – 9:00AM. Period Worship Service. Open to the public

9:00AM – Retiring of Colors – Event Closes

 

 

THE GRAND BALL

Saturday, April 25, 2015

6:00 – 9:00PM

 

  • Upon arrival, guests will need to walk from the designated parking area to the West Wing. Golf cart transport will be available all evening for those needing assistance.
  • Soldiers will escort & assist guests.
  • Food and beverages will be available in the West Wing Parlour beginning at 6:00PM. Cash bar.
  • The Ball will be held in the West Wing Dining Hall or Refectory. Music will be provided by the Booneslick Strings from St. Charles, Missouri.   The dance will be called by Mr. Martin Aubuchon, of Dance Discovery/St. Louis, Missouri.
  • Andrew Jackson will be portrayed by Grant Hardin of Hampton, TN.
  • Rachel Jackson will be portrayed by mezzo-soprano, Lester Senter Wilson, who will perform for General Jackson during intermission.
  • The dances will be simple so that all guests will feel comfortable to participate.   Mr. Aubuchon and Ms. Jeanne Anderson will assist participants. Dance lessons will be held from 1:00 – 3:00PM on Saturday.
  • Cost – $40.00/person. Purchase tickets by contacting Visit Natchez at     601-446-6345 or 800-647-6724
  • Effort is being made to make this as period correct as possible. Please help in this effort.
  • Period dress is suggested, but not required of the general public.               DO NOT LET THAT KEEP YOU FROM COMING !!!

 

HOTEL ACCOMODATIONS

  • Those wishing to stay in a hotel will be responsible for making their own arrangements
  • HOST HOTEL – Vue Hotel & Restaurant. 130 John R. Junkin Dr.   Block of 20 rooms, discounted to $89.00 + tax/night. Vue is locally owned. Go to vuehotelandrestaurant.com and use Group Code 11116.   Or, call 601-442-9976 or 888-946-4727 and say you are with the event sponsored by the Natchez Trace Parkway Association.

CONTACTS

 

Bryant R. Boswell

Event Coordinator

Immediate Past President, Natchez Trace Parkway Association

601-845-7994 (H) 618-978-7317 (C)

mtcreeklodge@aol.com

 

Mr. Adam Gwin

Local Arrangements

President, South MS Chapter, Natchez Trace Parkway Association

601-807-4088 (C)

adam@gwinfinefurniture.com

“SPEECH OF AN INDIAN”

By

Robert Perry

 

Book Release – 10:00AM, Saturday, April 25, 2015

Historic Jefferson College

Washington, MS

SYNOPSIS FROM THE BACK BOOK COVER:   A storyteller carries a bag of memories and forever seeks new tales. Stories have lives, too. If someone doesn’t share the story, it dies. Unless, like in this case, at least some fragment of the narrative remains. Within these pages you will find the storyteller discovers a published 1824 speech that a 19-year old Chickasaw man gave at Jefferson College (MS) commencement about survival on the wild frontiers of America. The story, long dead, begged for life. Strange that the speaker and storyteller had the same surname and were Chickasaw.

The Chickasaw people were removed from Mississippi in 1837 to Indian Territory (Oklahoma). The author from Oklahoma knew about James Perry, who founded Perryville.   Yet to be discovered: Perryville would have been Perry Town except that James Perry knew that town existed near Natchez, MS. His descendants had come from there. Everywhere the author turned, some new exciting bit was added to the chronicle. Engulf yourself now in the pages of the full fascinating narrative that has been skillfully woven together.

TRIUMPHANT RETURN- CELEBRATING A NEW AMERICAN SPIRIT- TUSCUMBIA

 

TRIUMPHANT RETURN- CELEBRATING A NEW AMERICAN SPIRIT

TUSCUMBIA, ALABAMA

JUNE 13, 2015

WAR OF 1812 BICENTENNIAL

Soldiers ReturnCommemoration and Reenactment of the Return of United States Soldiers on the Natchez Trace Following the Victory at the Battle of New Orleans in 1815.

As General Andrew Jackson returned on the Natchez Trace to his home the Hermitage in Tennessee, citizens from Natchez to Nashville held victory balls for the general and his troops.   General Jackson told his soldiers that they had “conquered the conquerors of Europe” by defeating the British to confirm their independence.  Though soldiers who marched to war at New Orleans identified themselves by their states or ancestry, they returned unified as one American people.  The victory led to a new identity as one nation and to a new American spirit.

A number of early Alabama leaders developed leadership and political skills while serving under General  Andrew Jackson and General John Coffee.  Several of the soldiers who fought at New Orleans soon bought land in what became the State of Alabama and became some of the state’s earliest citizens.    Jackson and Coffee are said to have decided to develop the town “York’s Bluff” during a return march.  The development became the town of Sheffield, Alabama, just north of Tuscumbia.

80th Anniv

SCHEDULE

Pre-Events.

SATURDAY, April 18, 12:30 -2:30PM. Helen Keller Library, Tuscumbia. Lisa Pace teaches workshop to make period women’s dance dress.

SATURDAY, MAY 9, 10-2PM, City of Tuscumbia Multi-Purpose Center, 601 E.N.Commons. Marty Aubuchon, caller from St. Louis, to teach period dances.

SATURDAY, June 6

  • 10 – 12 AM. Muscle Shoals City Hall, 2010 E. Avalon. War of 1812 Speakers.
  • Robert Perry, Chickasaw Elder, Mark Hubbs, Lanny Perry.

FRIDAY, June 12

  • 9-12 AM: Sheffield Encampment. Welcome by Mayor Ian Sanford. Alabama Forestry Service will dedicate a sign on the historic site and Richard Sheridan tells the rich history of the area. Educational events to follow. Concessions offered by Sheffield Parks & Recreation.
  • 2PM: The re-enactor soldiers and the Tuscumbia American Legion honor War of 1812 Veterans on front lawn of Colbert County Court House, Tuscumbia. Recognize Essay Contest Winner.
  • 5PM: Hiking and Cycling events sponsored by NTPA will end at the Encampment. Professor Gene Smith will speak on   Freemen of Color Soldiers in the War of 1812.

SATURDAY, June 13 (Locust Hill available 9AM to 12 PM)

  • 9AM: Coffee Cemetery, Florence. Private ceremony to lay a wreath at John Coffee’s grave.
  • 10:30AM: McFarland Park, Florence. Welcome by Florence Mayor Mickey Haddock. Speech by General John Coffee.
  • 10:30 – 12:00AM. Florence Tourism Conference Room, McFarland Park. Speakers: NTPA Bryant Boswell, NTPA Tony Turnbow.
  •  5:00 PM Parade east on 2nd Street to Locust Hill. General Andrew Jackson, wife Rachel and Andrew, Jr. ride in horse-drawn carriage in parade with Tennessee Volunteers.
  • 5:00-5:45 PM at Locust Hill. Welcome comments by Gov. Robert Bentley (invited, unconfirmed). General Jackson speaks and dismisses (musters out) troops by name.
  • VICTORY CELEBRATION AND  PERIOD BALL
  • 6PM: Doors open. Appetizers served.  Music by Sinclair Quartet.
  • 7-11PM: Dancing begins called out by Marty Aubuchon with music by the Booneslick Boys.
  • Hourly breaks for the musicians, Ubadu African Dancers on the lawn. Join in.

SUNDAY, 9AM June 14, . Period 1812 church service by preacher Jeff Sinclair, music by Sinclair quartet Public invited.

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT COLBERT COUNTY CVB..

REENACTORS INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING, CONTACT DR. BRYANT BOSWELL AT mtcreeklodge@aol.com AND FOR MORE INFORMATION, CLICK HERE.

PHOTOS FROM PAST NATCHEZ TRACE PARKWAY ASSOCIATION LIVING HISTORY EVENTS AND PARTICIPATION IN  WAR OF 1812 BICENTENNIAL EVENTS:

Click on a link below:

BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS

DEFENDING THE NATCHEZ TRACE: SOUTHEAST AMERICAN INDIANS IN THE WAR OF 1812

CAMP BLOUNT

FORT MIMS

EXPEDITION NATCHEZ 1813:  BECOMING OLD HICKORY

MUSTER ON THE NATCHEZ TRACE

NATCHEZ TRACE PARKWAY ASSOCIATION LIVING HISTORY AND EDUCATION INITIATIVES ARE FUNDED THROUGH CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE MARTY OWENS LIVING HISTORY FUND.  TO DONATE, CLICK ON THE “DONATE” TAB BELOW, OR CONTACT US AT info@natcheztrace.org

Link

TRIUMPHANT RETURN- CELEBRATING A NEW AMERICAN SPIRIT- NATCHEZ

TRIUMPHANT RETURN- CELEBRATING A NEW AMERICAN SPIRIT

NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI

APRIL 24-25, 2015

WAR OF 1812 BICENTENNIAL

Soldiers ReturnCommemoration and Reenactment of the Return of United States Soldiers on the Natchez Trace Following the Victory at the Battle of New Orleans in 1815.

Just prior to General Andrew Jackson’s return on the Natchez Trace to his home the Hermitage in Tennessee, citizens of Natchez and nearby Washington, Mississippi Territory held victory balls for the general and his troops.   General Jackson told his soldiers that they had “conquered the conquerors of Europe” by defeating the British to confirm their independence.  Some British prisoners of war  from the Battle of New Orleans were sent to Washington, Mississippi Territory to be held until exchanged. Though soldiers who marched to war at New Orleans identified themselves by their states or ancestry, they returned unified as one American people.  The victory led to a new identity as one nation and to a new American spirit.

80th Anniv

SCHEDULE

Friday, April 24, 2015

9 a.m.- Noon.  ENCAMPMENT AND EDUCATION INITIATIVE.  Historic Jefferson College, Washington, MS.  Reenactors portray Jackson’s  victorious troops in period camps.  School groups and general public.

4:00 p.m.  PARADE.  Natchez, MS.  Parade of soldiers through the historic town.

Saturday, April 25, 2015

9 a.m.- 2 p.m.  ENCAMPMENT AND EDUCATION INITIATIVE.  Historic Jefferson College, Washington, MS.  Reenactors portray Jackson’s victorius troops in period camps.  General public.

9:00AM – 4:00PM – Encampment open to the public.

10:00 – 10:30AM – Speech of an Indian,  Presentation and book release by Chickasaw Elder, Robert Perry – West Wing Parlour. Book signing follows.

10:45AM – 12:00 noon – Panel discussion. Tony Turnbow, moderator, West Wing The Role of Adams & Jefferson Counties in the War of 1812 and the  Creation of a New American Spirit

–  Mimi Miller, Natchez Historic Foundation

-Lance Harris- Director, Natchez Grand Village

Smoyke Joe Frank- Local Historian

-Jessica Crawford- Southeast Regional Director,  The Archaeological Conservancy

– Lou Ritten- Author, Fort Adams

12:00 – 1:00PM – lunch

1:00 – 3:00PM – Period Dance Lessons – West Wing Dining Hall.

5:30PM – Evening Colors

6 p.m. – 9 p.m.  VICTORY BALL.  West Hall,  Historic Jefferson College, Washington, MS.

      – Reception and heavy hors d’oeuvres in West Parlour.

      – Arrival of General Jackson, Rachel Jackson, and Andrew Jackson, Jr.  by carriage.  General Jackson delivers a brief victory address.

      – Period dance in the refectory.  Music by the Booneslick Strings, of St. Charles, Missouri.  Called by Martin Aubuchon of Dance Discovery of St. Louis, Missouri. (Period dress is suggested but not required).

VICTORY BALL tickets are  $40 each.  To purchase tickets, call VISIT NATCHEZ at  601-446-6345 or 800-647-6724.

SUNDAY, April 26, 2014.

9:00 – 9:30 a.m.  PERIOD WORSHIP SERVICE.  Historic Jefferson College.  Jeff Sinclair portrays Andrew Jackson’s chaplain Rev. Learner Blackman.  Open to the public.

REENACTORS WHO WISH TO PARTICIPATE, CONTACT DR. BRYANT BOSWELL AT mtcreeklodge@aol.com AND CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION.

Historic Jefferson College is located on the old Natchez Trace between the historic sites of Fort Dearborn and Washington Tavern where the 1815 victory ball was held.  Neither site is open to the public; however, the buildings at Historic Jefferson College date from c. 1820.

PHOTOS FROM PAST NATCHEZ TRACE PARKWAY ASSOCIATION LIVING HISTORY EVENTS AND PARTICIPATION IN  WAR OF 1812 BICENTENNIAL EVENTS:

Click on a link below:

BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS

DEFENDING THE NATCHEZ TRACE: SOUTHEAST AMERICAN INDIANS IN THE WAR OF 1812

CAMP BLOUNT

FORT MIMS

EXPEDITION NATCHEZ 1813:  BECOMING OLD HICKORY

MUSTER ON THE NATCHEZ TRACE

NATCHEZ TRACE PARKWAY ASSOCIATION LIVING HISTORY AND EDUCATION INITIATIVES ARE FUNDED THROUGH CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE MARTY OWENS LIVING HISTORY FUND.  TO DONATE, CLICK ON THE “DONATE” TAB BELOW, OR CONTACT US AT info@natcheztrace.org.

HIGHLAND RIM SECTION

Highland Rim Section of the National Scenic Trail

Break up the hike with destination points along the trail:

 

427.4 Garrison Creek- Garrison Creek photo

 

Old Natchez Trace Indian Trail Overlook – Natchez Trace Garrison Crrek Trail 038

 

President Thomas Jefferson’s Military Road Natchez Trace Garrison Crrek Trail 012

 

War of 1812 Memorial Site-Natchez Trace Fall 3 082

 

Burns Branch –IMG_6822

Water Valley Overlook –IMG_8265

Duck River – IMG_8932    

 

MAPS

 

The Highland Rim Section of the Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail runs for 28 miles from Garrison Creek at milepost 427.4 to the Duck River at milepost 408.  Parking is available at each end of the trail section and at pull off areas on the parkway along the trail.  Restroom facilities are available at Garrison Creek and at the Gordon House on each end of the trail.

NATT_Garrison Creek 1Garrison Creek Map 2

TRAIL FIT CHALLENGE

 

ARE YOU UP FOR THE CHALLENGE TO GET TRAIL FIT?

 

Add adventure to your workout while surrounded by nature.  The trail is all  the workout equipment you  need.  Take the challenge of 28 miles on the Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail to get fit or just relax outdoors.  The national park is not far from Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin and Columbia, Tennessee — just far enough from the city to experience the extra benefits of a workout on a National Park trail.

 

Introduction to the Trail Fit Challenge:

 

#TrailFit
 

THE  TRAIL FIT CHALLENGE

1. Reach your target destination on the trail.

2. Reach a farther target destination on the trail.

3.  Reach a farther target destination on the trail faster.

4.  Reach a farther target destination on the trail faster carrying an increasingly heavier weight.

Select the Portion of the Trail that Meets Your Fitness Needs-  The  200 foot climb at the north trail will raise your heart rate, and  a brisk walk on the two-mile hike to the War of 1812  Memorial Site will keep the rate up.  If you are just beginning, you may prefer to park at the War of 1812  Memorial Site and walk north toward the trail head, making a loop back before descending the hill.

Push Your Endurance-  Determine your endurance limit and push the limit.

Extend Your Endurance-  Each time you hike the trail, add a quarter-mile or half-mile.  Plan eventually to hike the entire 28 miles.

Compare Stats-  Encourage and challenge friends to take the challenge with you and compare your results.

WHAT YOU WILL NEED

While you will not need specialized equipment, you should plan to bring the following items:

– Hiking boots or shoes with  soles designed for the outdoor terrain.

– Water.  There is a water fountain at the Garrison Creek comfort station but no other fountains along the trail.  Consider the temperature and humidity level to determine the amount of water you will need.

-Insect Repellent.  If you are allergic to insect bites, apply insect repellent before beginning the hike for non-winter hikes.

-First Aid Kit.  Consider taking moleskins for blisters, antibiotic ointment, bandages, scissors, tweezers, pain reliever and whistle to signal for help if you have an emergency.

PHYSICAL BENEFITS

1.  Strength-  The largest muscles in your body are from the waist down.  By strengthening those muscles on the hike, you add strength to your entire body.  Each step activates muscles in your lower back and makes them stronger.

2.  Cardiovascular-  As you hike, the heart and lungs work harder to pump blood to supply oxygen to the muscles in the lower body.  The heart is a muscle that also becomes stronger during the workout.  Physical results may include lowered blood pressure.

3.  Endurance- Gradually increasing distance or pace adds to the ability of your body to endure greater physical challenges.

4.  Muscle tone-  Your muscles respond to repetitive hikes by taking on a more physically fit appearance and movement.

PHYSCHOLOGICAL BENEFITS

A walk on the trail helps clear the mind and reduce stress with natural stress relievers.  Some physicians are adopting the practice of writing prescriptions for trail hikes to help reduce patients’ stress levels.

IN THE STEPS OF ANCESTORS

The old Natchez Trace trail is one of the oldest trails in North America.  Early humans walked it when traveling from the South American continent to the area that is now Canada.  American Indian warriors and chiefs traveled its path for hunting, trade, and war.  Early Americans such as Meriwether Lewis, Andrew Jackson, James John Audubon, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston,  and maybe even Abraham Lincoln walked sections of the trace.

 

Consult your physician before undertaking any strenuous physical activity to determine your own safe physical limitations.

 

 

Cycling Information

IMG_9737

Cyclists call the Natchez Trace Parkway a road of glass (referring to the smooth surface of the road), through the lush southern landscape.  Because the parkway ride is uninterrupted by traffic lights and it has no turns to map, cyclists can focus on relaxation and the pure joy of riding.  Many cyclists also choose to ride the parkway to feel its connection to history.  More than a few serious cyclists include the parkway on their “bucket list” of things to do in their lives.  Cycling clubs along the parkway sponsor organized rides throughout the year.

IMG_7108

CYCLING SAFETY

IMG_9942 Motorists and cyclists share the same space on the parkway.  Unlike modern public highways  built primarily for automobile transportation, the road through the park has no paved shoulders, and each lane is two feet narrower than the current modern standard.  Posted speed limits are lower than on comparable public highways.  Both bicycles and automobiles have the same right to occupy the park road. The numerous curves, changing angles and directions of sunlight on the curves, and shadowing effect of foliage present unique challenges for drivers on the parkway.   Drivers who travel long distances on the road or who travel the road often may not be as alert as other drivers.  If you plan to ride a bicycle on the parkway, you are encouraged to make yourself visible to motorists as much as possible. Consider these safety features to make yourself more visible:

 

  1. High Visibility Safety Green or Yellow Clothing-  High-visibility yellow or green clothing improves visibility, whereas black, dark green or other dark or natural colors can act to camouflage you in the natural landscape.  Notice the difference in the visibility of the two cyclists in the photo at the top of the page.    Even if you  wear bright, non-natural colored clothing, low angles of sunlight  in the mornings and evenings may prevent motorists from seeing you.
  2. Lighting- Flashing 180 degree lighting set at proper angles on both the front and rear of the bike may provide some additional visibility.IMG_6677
  3.  Flags-  Cyclists, particularly those in reclining cycles, often add flags in a high visibility color to make themselves more visible.

There is no certainty that even if you take all precautions possible, a motorist will see you. Though motorists are required to observe the three-foot passing rule, be alert for motorists, particularly in more urban areas such as Ridgeland, Tupelo and Clinton where larger numbers of motorists use the park road to commute.  An off-road multi-use trail is available for cyclists in the park through Ridgeland.

SHARE THE PARKWAY SAFETY PROGRAM

The Association works with NPS and Adventure Cycling Association through our Gary Holdiness Cycling Fund to study and improve safety conditions on the parkway.  The goal is to make a visit to the park a safe and enjoyable experience for motorists, cyclists, hikers, and every other visitor.  Superintendent Mary Risser recently provided an update on the program:

 

PowerPoint Presentation

IMG_7958

CAMPING

Cyclists staying overnight on the parkway are encouraged to plan their trips to use designated campgrounds found on the Natchez Trace Parkway map. Bicycle-only Campground Sites include: Kosciusko, mile post 159. Witch Dance, mile post 234. Natchez Trace Parkway Visitor Center, mile post 266. Colbert’s Ferry, mile post 327. Tennessee Highway 50, mile post 408.

IMG_9523

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ORGANIZED RIDES

IMG_7567 IMG_7756 Groups and clubs along the Natchez Trace Parkway sponsor organized rides throughout the year.  Several rides support our Gary Holdiness Cycling Fund.   Organized rides include the following:

 

Mid-Mississippi

 

Little Mountain Ride:  Sponsored by the Attala Cycling Club, the ride for 2016 will be on June 18.  It starts in Kosciusko, Mississippi and runs to French Camp and Little Mountain

.IMG_7071

 

Southern Mississippi

 

 Natchez Trace Century Ride–  The ride offers options of 25, 50,  62 or 100 miles.  For more information, visit www.ridgelandms.org.

 

Alabama

 

Colbert 20–  A total of 40 miles from the Lauderdale site on the north side of the Tennessee River, across the John Coffee Memorial Bridge and the Tennessee River, past Colbert Ferry and Buzzard Roost, then up to the Freedom Hills and the Mississippi/Alabama State Line at Bear Creek Mound.  Sponsored by the Association with the support of the Shoals Cycling Club. pix105

 

Tennessee

James Robertson 40 – From the Northern Terminus of the parkway, across the iconic Double Arch bridge to Leiper’s Fork and back.  The ride honors James Robertson, often called the “Father oF Nashville,” but also an early agent to the Chickasaw Nation and subcontractor who completed the Natchez Trace wagon road in 1807.

Robertson 40 Ride

DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

 

The Daughters of the American Revolution began a program in 1903 to place markers along the old Natchez Trace.  Mrs. Elizabeth Jones, of Holly Springs, Mississippi, said, “We are in danger of losing all traces of our one-famous military road” and as state regent she began a movement to mark the old Natchez Trace.  Similar programs were later adopted in Alabama and in Tennessee.

The following are DAR monuments placed along the old Natchez Trace.  Many of the markers are not located on the Natchez Trace Parkway.

a.New Hillsboro PikeHwy.46@Old Natchez Trace aa.Old Hillsboro PikeHw.46@ Old Natchez TraceRd.  aaaaa.TobaccoFarm(MP401.4) aaaaaa.MeriwetherLewis(MP385)  aaaaaaaa.Old Trace Drive(Bet.MP374&375)  aaaaaaaaaa.Tishomingo(Hwy.25@Trace St.) aaaaaaaaaaaaaa.Overlook(MP264) aaaaaaaaaaaaaa.TupeloNat.BattleField(Hwy.6,5.4mi.E.of MP260. aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.HoustonCitySquare(MP230,MSHwy.8) aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.Mathison(MP204.1 on USHwy.82 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.Thomastown(MP145,half blockN.inters.Ms429& aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.FrenchCamp(MP180.7) aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.KosciuskoRedbudSpringsPark aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.Madisonville(MP114.7 onMSHwy.43) aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.Clinton(MSCollegeCampus,CollegeSt.) aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.PortGibson((MSHwy.547) aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.MP20, MSHwy553 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.Mt.Locust(MP15.5) aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaKosciuskoRedbudSpringsPark    ElizaFemaleColl.Marker(MP6) Natchez S.BroadwayOverlook SouthernTerminus

Membership Application

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

Name:_______________________________________________________________

Address:_____________________________________________________________

Company (if applicable)_______________________________________________

Email Address:________________________________________________________

Telephone Number:____________________________________________________

 

Select one:

BASIC MEMBERSHIP:  Annual (January 1 – December 31)                                                    Amt. Enclosed

$25       Basic Family Membership (3 year – $65)………………………………………………….  _______

$50       Basic Business, Government, or Organizational Membership…………………………. ________

LIFE MEMBERSHIP Listed in the Post Rider

$500      Life Membership (Senior, 65y/o+)………………………………………………………. _________

$750      Life Membership (45 – 64y/o)…………………………………………………………….._________

$1,000   Life Membership (Birth – 44y/o)………………………………………………………….. _________

If you would also like to make a donation, please consider one of the

following levels:

$500 – $999                  Silver Level Donor…………………………………………………….. _________

$1,000 – $2,499           Gold Level Donor……………………………………………………..  __________

$2,500 – $4,999           Platinum Level Donor………………………………………………… __________

$5,000 – $10,000 +  Diamond Level Donor…………………………………………………… __________

Please email to info@natcheztrace.info or mail to:

Natchez Trace Parkway Association

P.O. Box 412

Star, MS  39167

Marty Owens Living History Fund

Bringing Natchez Trace History to Life for the Next Generation

The Marty Owens Living History Fund promotes programming to encourage living history portrayals of historic people, customs, and events associated with the old Natchez Trace.  Living history events permit people to experience the sights and sounds of earlier eras.  The total sensory experience sparks an interest in learning more about the events, and it produces a better understanding.

The Association has formed a living history group to interpret Natchez Trace history.  The bicentennial of the War of 1812 has provided new opportunities to tell one of the important stories of the Natchez Trace.  In 2012 and 2013, the living history group reached over 4,000 participants, including school groups.

Marty Owens

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Marty Owens

Marty Owens served as administrative assistant to the Natchez Trace Parkway Superintendent for over two decades.  In that position, she was able to contribute ideas during a formative time when the Natchez Trace Parkway was under development.  Marty loved the Natchez Trace Parkway, particularly its history, and she loved sharing her interest in the parkway with others.  Marty also encouraged her own grandchildren to portray Natchez Trace characters to learn more about its history.   Marty Owens’ friends chose to remember her by creating a fund to perpetuate her interest in Natchez Trace history.

Living History

How You Can Help

1.  Contribute to the Fund.  Click the PayPal “Donate” button to the left to make a contribution.  Specify the Marty Owens Living History Fund. Funds are used to purchase and maintain tents, uniforms, and other equipment used for portrayals on the parkway, as well as other expenses for living history events.

2.  Contact Us to Learn How to Participate in an Event.  Email us at info@natcheztrace.info.

3.  Attend Natchez Trace Parkway Living History Events.  The next event is scheduled for April 10-12 at Colbert Ferry on the Natchez Trace Parkway.

 

Gary Holdiness Cycling Fund

Holdiness Logo

Promoting Cycling & Cycling Safety

on the

Natchez Trace Parkway

Holdiness, Gary Photo-1The Gary Holdiness Cycling Fund was established to honor the memory of Dr. Gary Holdiness by perpetuating his love for cycling the Natchez Trace Parkway and to make it a safe environment for cyclists.

The Association is working with the Natchez Trace Parkway to study a number of proposals to make the parkway a safer riding environment for cyclists.   This fund will help finance projects approved by the parkway to increase motorist awareness of cyclists.    The fund will also promote projects to encourage cycling on the parkway.

Dr. Gary Holdiness of Kosciusko, Mississippi was a avid cyclist, who combined his love for the sport with a passion for the Natchez Trace Parkway.  He spent numerous hours on the parkway finding relaxation from his medical practice and encouraging others to enjoy the park as a national treasure.  While riding on the parkway in 2012, Dr. Holdiness was struck and killed by an automobile.  His family and friends created the Gary Holdiness Cycling Fund to continue his work of promoting the recreational use of the parkway and to make it a safer environment for others.

CYCLING SAFETY PILOT PROGRAM
    Through the Gary Holdiness Cycling Fund, the Natchez Trace Parkway Association is working in  collaboration with the National Park Service  and Adventure Cycling Association to determine methods to make experiencing the park safer for cyclists and motorists.
    The program currently includes the following:
SIGNS AND SHARROWS
    New signs and sharrows have been installed, and they are currently being studied to determine their effectiveness.
 Safety sign med
SAFETY TESTING
    During the National Trails Conference in June, 2015, trail leaders, NPS personnel and volunteers participating in a safety study to determine the effectiveness of high visibility clothing and lights to make cyclists more visible.  The tests demonstrated the effectiveness of the new high visibility coral color for clothing.  High visibility green (yellow) also stands out in most conditions; however, it sometimes blends with the yellows of the leaves in certain lighting conditions.  Black, green, white, blue, and red were shown to blend into the horizon much sooner than high visibility coral.

safety test
     We will soon begin testing the effectiveness of improving visibility with lighting.  Blinking tail lights with at light of at least one-half watt helps improve visibility and clear head lights also improve visibility even in shadowed areas.
PUBLIC AWARENESS
With support of the Mississippi Association of Broadcasters, Public Service Announcements are being aired on television and radio stations in the State of Mississippi.

 

 

How You Can Help

1.  Contribute.  Donations to the fund are used to work with the Natchez Trace Parkway to promote cycling and cycling safety, including studying and improving cycling safety on the road.  Click on the “Donate” button on the bottom of  the page.   Complete page one with your payment information that is sent directly to PayPal, and click the “Review and Continue” button at the bottom of the form.  It will take you to a second page where you can leave a message noting that you are restricting your donation to the Gary Holdiness Cycling Fund.  The confirmation letter that you receive from our Treasurer should note that you have restricted your donation to the Gary Holdiness Cycling Fund.  If you have any problems in the donation process, please contact us.  You may also mail a check to Natchez Trace Parkway Association, P.O. Box 740425, Tuscumbia, AL  35674.  Please make the check payable to Natchez Trace Parkway Association and in the “for” area, note “Gary Holdiness Cycling Fund.”

2.  Contact Us About Sponsoring A Ride.  We are working with cycling clubs to create special rides to raise awareness about the presence of cyclists on the parkway and ways to improve safety.

Donna Holdiness assists with the 2013 Tour d'Attalla Ride, to raise money for the fund

Donna Holdiness assists with the 2013 Tour d’Attalla Ride, to raise money for the fund

3.  Participate.  Join us for one of the rides that contribute to the Gary Holdiness Cycling Fund of the Natchez Trace Parkway Association.

4.  Wear Our T-shirt.  Contact us at info@natcheztrace.info to find out how to get our t-shirt and spread the message about the importance of sharing the road with cyclists.

tshirt Holdiness

75th Anniversary Ceremony- May 18, 2013

The 75th Anniversary of the Natchez Trace Parkway was celebrated exactly 75 years from the day the Natchez Trace Parkway became an independent unit of the National Park System.  Longtime supporters, legislators, NPS and Federal Highway Administration officials recognized the efforts that made the parkway a reality.  As Senator Roger Wicker reminded the crowd, it may seem now that completion of the parkway was inevitable, but for many years, people doubted that it would ever be finished.  Malcolm Gardner, Jr., whose father was the first Natchez Trace Parkway superintendent, and Stephen Harriman, who father was its first chief ranger, attended the ceremony.  Harry Martin and Jean Ratliff, who were critical parts of the “Finish the Trace” work that completed the motor road were present.  The public enjoyed a vintage car show, Choctaw culture, living history, as well as musical entertainment.

NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 030 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 038 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 044 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 060 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 067 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 068 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 069 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 071 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 080 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 081 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 106 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 139 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 141 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 187 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 196 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 197 NATCHEZ TRACE 75TH 211

Expedition Natchez 1813: Becoming “Old Hickory”

Expedition Natchez Sunday-Tuesday 280Expedition Natchez Saturday 149Expedition Natchez Saturday 009Expedition Natchez Sunday-Tuesday 471Expedition Natchez 1813 2Expedition Natchez Saturday 233Expedition Natchez Sunday-Tuesday 351FlagIMG_6421Expedition Natchez CampfireExpedition Natchez French CampAndrew Jackson's Troops Return Home on the Natchez TraceExpedition Natchez Saturday 2 251  Expedition Natchez Saturday 2 192Expedition Natchez 1813.  War of 1812 Memorial SiteNatchez Expediton Wreath on Andrew Jackson's Grave

The Natchez Trace Parkway Association commemorated the bicentennial of the 1813 Natchez Expedition on the Natchez Trace Parkway through a ten-day living history event from Natchez to Nashville.  The event re-created events from the landing of the troops at Natchez and the parade through the city, the encampment at Fort Dearborn, camp sites at Brashears’ Stand and the Choctaw Agency, a ceremonial crossing of the Tennessee River at Colbert Ferry and the dismissal of the troops at Grinder’s Stand.  Along the way, ceremonies were held in the Old Mississippi State Capitol building and at the War of 1812 Memorial Site, Tuscumbia  and  the Hermitage.    A period reception for the troops was held at the Natchez Prentiss Club and a period dinner was hosted at the Eola Hotel.  Ladies held an 1813 tea at Auburn Historic House.  Education camps reached about 2,000 students in Mississippi.

Expedition Natchez 1813: Becoming “Old Hickory”

Tennessee Chapter

 

The Tennessee chapter works to connect Tennessee communities to the parkway and to improve the visitor experience along the one-hundred mile portion of the parkway in Tennessee.  Committees are being formed for the three main areas of interest:

 

Recreation:

            Plans are being made to increase cycling and hiking through organized rides and hikes.  Learn how you can explore your interest in these areas with other members of the association by joining  and taking part in activities.

History:

            We are planning activities this winter to explore and map some of the historic Natchez Trace in Tennessee. Living History events have already begun in the Tennessee section.  If you have an interest in portraying historic Natchez Trace characters or supporting living history events, contact Jeff Brewer,  to learn more. 

Trails/Nature/Conservation

            We are organizing members and volunteer groups to help the National Park Service maintain the trails along the parkway, including the Highland Rim National Scenic Trail.  We are planning ways to offer to improve the trails.  We are also planning special events to encourage people to get off the pavement and on to the trails. 

            Protection of the scenic view is critical to assuring that the Natchez Trace Parkway always offers a quality experience and one that serves to help visitors relax and connect with nature.  We support the efforts of the Land Trust of Tennessee, which partners with the National Park Service to help protect the scenic view.

            If you are looking for a great place to hike in Middle Tennessee, and you would like to help make the Natchez Trace trails the best in the region, contact Jean Chevallier to learn how you can get involved. 

Education

            A national park is a valuable asset for education for both tourists and local schools.  We are developing cellular telephone tours and a mobile ap to help all visitors to the parkway get the most benefit from their experience.  The National Park Service continues to add to lesson plans available to teachers.  If you are interested in helping connect classrooms to the parkway and make the parkway more educational, contact Jim Drury.

2012 Annual Meeting

natchez 75th 017 natchez 75th 048natchez 75th 094  IMG_2413Natchez Trace Parkway 75 2 043 Natchez Trace Parkway 75 2 085 Natchez Trace Parkway 75 2 025Natchez Trace Parkway 75 2 086 100_0861

1937 Parkway Inaugural at Brandon Hall

Natchez Trace Parkway 75 2 003Natchez Trace Parkway 75 2 106 1937 Parkway Inaugural at Brandon Hall

The Nathcez Trace Parkway Association celebrated the 75th Anniversary of the Inaugural of the Natchez Trace Parkway on October 18, 1937 at Brandon Hall Plantation in Natchez by returning to Brandon Hall for the 2012 Annual Meeting.  Special honor was given to Roane Fleming Byrnes, who served as president of the Association from 1934 to 1969.  A plaque was unveiled at her grave.  The Natchez Trace Ball, a popular fundraiser in the early years, was recreated at the Natchez Eola Hotel, with music from the period.  Returning to the same porch at Brandon Hall where the ceremony was held in 1937, the Association honored its early founders whose vision and persistence made the parkway dream a reality.   The Memorial Park area on the parkway, created during the 1937 inaugural event with treess planted by the states and by the U.S. and Mexican governments, was restored.  A 75th Anniversary tree was planted near the remaining 1937 tree, planted by New Orleans Times-Picayune editor George Healey in 1937,  Mrs. Byrnes neices,, and Mr. Hollis, who was present at the 1937 ceremony, assisted in the planting. Also, as in 1937, a barbeque at Brandon Hall concluded the event.  Thanks  to the Garber family for their hospitality at Brandon Hall.

 

 

 

War of 1812 Memorial Site And Monument Dedication

  IMG_1352IMG_1413 .IMG_1390IMG_1457

On the bicentennial of U.S. declaration of war against the British, the U.S. Daughters of 1812 dedicated a monument honoring the soldiers who marched and died on the Natchez Trace during the war.  Superintendent Cam Sholly announced that the site would be renamed the “War of 1812 Memorial Site.”  A large stone wall separates the site from the parkway and creates a contemplative space on the hilltop.  The visitor is guided by the road and a sidewalk to the crest of the hill along a section of the old trace where the monument may be viewed.

Muster on the Natchez Trace 1812

IMG_0961 IMG_1053 IMG_1034 IMG_0979 IMG_0907  IMG_1109IMG_0816 fife and drum IMG_0991 IMG_1138 IMG_1154

The Natchez Trace Parkway Association, in partnership with the 7th U.S. Living History Association and the National Park Service, began a four-year living history program on the parkway to re-enact events associated with its role in the War of 1812.  Captain John Gordon’s house and ferry site was the location of the Memorial Day 2012 event “Muster on the Natchez Trace 1812.”    As in the spring of 1812, a muster was held of volunteer militia, when word arrived that a settler had been taken hostage.  A debate ensued over whether the nation should go to war.  Military recruiters enlisted volunteers, as fife and drum musicians created a patriotic mood.  A period church service was held before the soldiers marched from their families to meet the enemy.  A memorial was held for Captain Gordon.  Members of his family were present.  Captain Gordon was the Captian of the Company of Spies for Andrew Jackson.  General Jackson sent Gordon as the sole spy into Spanish-held Pensacola.    Based upon the intelligence that Captain Gordon provided, Jackson attacked Pensacola.  Jackson noted that Captiain Gordon frequently moved to the front of action during battle.  Gordon moved with his family from Nashville to the ferry site in 1812, as war was threatened.

Enjoy Recreation

Natchez Trace Spring 039The Natchez Trace Parkway includes about 65 miles of completed Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail in five segments.  The Natchez Trace Parkway motor road is part of the National Bike Trails System. In addition, there are miles of multi-use trails for cycles. IMG_6591

Hiking trails range from short distances over generally level surfaces to trails several miles in length through hilly terrain. Both provide good opportunities to experience the distinctive topography and nature of each state, to relax and to get fit. Tennessee River Boating

Boating is available on the Tennessee River and canoeing is popular on the Buffalo and Duck rivers. DSC_8395Sail boating and other boating are popular on the Ross Barnett Reservoir.

Select specific topics to learn more about recreation on the Natchez Trace Parkway.

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The Association is a member of the Partnership for National Trails Systems, a non-profit organization comprised of over 33 national parks and national scenic trails.

 

PNTS_org

Traveling Exhibit

The Association is developing a traveling exhibit that tells the fascinating story of the Natchez Trace and Natchez Road. The exhibit will be available to non-profit organizations in towns along the parkway. The exhibit will form the core of a larger display that incorporates the history of the town and its association with the road. Participants will be encouraged to develop some of their own Trace-related displays that will last beyond the temporary exhibit.. To learn more about participating in the exhibit, contact info@natcheztrace.info.

Sponsor the Natchez Trace Traveling Exhibit

One Panel of the Natchez Trace Traveling Exhibit

Living History

IMG_5999The best introduction to history is to experience it. The Association supports the National Park Service living history program, and it is developing a new program, through which it often partners with the parkway to bring history to life. Throughout the year, historic sites such as the Gordon House, Colbert’s Ferry, Mount Locust and Grinder’s Stand come to life with the sights and sounds of the period when the Natchez Trace and Natchez Road were important transportation corridors. The National Park Service began a living history program on the parkway in the 1970’s. The annual Meriwether Lewis Arts and Crafts Festival, which includes living history IMG_0987demonstrations, is approaching its 40th year. Encampments at Mount Locust have focused on portrayals of life in the southern Mississippi area along the Natchez Trace. Regular living history events are scheduled at headquarters .

 

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The association is developing a new living history program to provide additional living history events along the parkway. In 2012, we entered into a partnership with the National Park Service and the 7th U.S. Living History Association to begin a four- year commemoration of the bicentennial of the War of 1812. Those events have prevented education stations to  a few thousand school children in the three Natchez Trace states.

Many of those school children gave the event their “awesome” stamp of approval.

 

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We are also developing relationships with the Chickasaw Nation and the Choctaw Nation to present accurate portrayals of their historic homelands. We support the annual Oka Kapasa Festival in Tuscumbia. Each September, they bring together Creeks, Chickasaws, Choctaws, and other American Indians to celebrate their American Indian heritage, and the close relationship the Tuscumbia community along the old Natchez Trace developed with the American Indians. Oka-Kapassa-2012-094

 

An active living history program along the parkway will make history real for younger generations and utilize the rich historic resources that relate to the old road and its communities. To see galleries of some of our past living history events, click on the following links:

 

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UPCOMING EVENTS

BICENTENNIAL OF JACKSON’S MILITARY ROAD

After the Battle of New Orleans in 1815, General Andrew Jackson proposed this road as a shorter and improved route for military movements between Nashville and New Orleans. The U.S. War Department authorized Jackson to appoint an engineer and procure equipment in 1816 and Congress appropriated $5,000 to begin construction. The Military Road was built by about 300 American soldiers over a three-year period at a construction cost of $300,000. When completed on May 17, 1820, the new road was 483 miles long and 200 miles shorter than the old Natchez Trace route. Crossing the Tennessee River at Florence, it entered Sheffield (first known as York Bluff) at “Jackson Hollow.” The road then passed near Atlanta and Columbia Avenues as it moved southwest. The Military Road entered Tuscumbia on Dickson Street and passed near this site.The nearby single-pen hewn-log cabin is a vestige of Tuscumbia’s pioneer period. It originally stood on the opposite side of the street and reputedly served as a stagecoach stop on the Military Road. Dickson Street was named for early Tuscumbia settler Michael Dickson. A U. S. Mail line was established and John Donley Sr. of Tuscumbia was given the contract for carrying the mail. Stagecoaches could travel the Military Road in 17 days and stands were built along the way to accommodate travelers. The road became the route over which pioneers poured into northwest Alabama and Mississippi.

NTP Living History Event April 2016 PngJackson's Military Road Marker Reverse Side Photo, Click for full size
 Its the Bicentennial of the building of the road.   We  are trying to assemble a small  group of like minded Living Historians to depict the actual surveying and building of the road. Possible persons needed are:
 -District of Nashville Soldiers from the 1st and 8th infantry
-An artillery detachment who supplied the labor
– Civilians portraying the Dickson family, the first settlers
-Captain H. Young surveyed the route
-Chickasaw guides
Chief Tuscumbia
-Hugh Finley Blacksmith
-David Keller
-Col. James McDonald
– William Russell
-Gen John Coffee
– Ferdinand Sannoner
Plans are for there to be being Living history programs through out the day on Friday April 22, 2016 in Spring park to school groups. Afterwards A period seated dinner , by candlelight, for the Living Historians in a  Homestead of this era with costumed servants.  After the evening meal, perhaps music and dance of the time frame,  then a discussion on how to grow this living history event into  a full blown events  for the upcoming year 2017-20.  On Saturday  April 23, 2016, demonstrations at the log cabin, which is located on the original Military Road, on surveying and public interactions discussing the Military road construction.
Contact Tony Turnbow, Annie Perry, or Lisa Pace at info@natcheztrace.org.


 

Expedition Natchez Thurs 020For more information on Natchez Trace Parkway Association Living History, contact info@natcheztrace.org

Become A Member

In addition to providing valuable support to improving the visitor experience on the Parkway, members receive:
– Updates on events and developments on the Parkway through the member newsletter The Post Rider
– The opportunity to meet and work with people who share an interest in the Parkway.  Opportunities include local chapter meetings  and the annual membership meeting.
– The opportunity to participate in special events for members.
– A membership card.

– An automobile window sticker.
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Dues:
Individual $25
Business $ 50

CLICK HERE for membership application.

Interactive membership form

Association Goals

EXPLORE


COMPLETE

-Projects encouraged by the Association for completion of the park.  The listing of the goals is not intented to represent the position of the National Park Service as to the viability of the projects for the parkway.


SUPPORT


PROTECT

More History- The War Of 1812

IMG_1097The threat of imminent attack by a foreign power produced an early unity along  the people living along the old Trace.  At the Battle of New Orleans, American militiamen and U.S. Army Regulars fought side by side with American Indians and free men of color to defend their common homeland.  General Jackson insisted that American Indians and men of color be paid the same amounts as the militiamen, and some held positions of high rank.
After the Revolutionary War, leaders of the new American republic preferred to rely on volunteer militias rather than a large standing army.  All men were expected to muster and train throughout the year to be prepared to defend their homes and their country.  Cavalry officers were generally farmers, professionals and businessmen.  Officers wore uniform similar to those worn by officers in the U.S. army.  Most soldiers in the  War of 1812, like today’s military, were in their late teen and early twenties; however, each company was led by a group of musicians, and drummers were sometimes as young as twelve.  The drummer’s beat served as a form of communication.

1812 A NATION ON THE BRINK OF WAR

1813  EXPEDITION NATCHEZ
1814  PREPARING TO ENCOUNTER THE BRITISH
1815  VICTORY AT NEW ORLEANS AND RETURN MARCHES ON THE NATCHEZ ROAD

HIGHLIGHTS OF WAR OF 1812 SITES ALONG THE PARKWAY

0.  Natchez-  Andrew Jackson’s infantry landed in a flotilla on the Mississippi River on Feb. 15, 1813, and marched through the town to Fort Dearborn to join the cavalry which had marched down the Natchez Road.  In 1814 and 1815, Natchez served as a supply depot and hospital for the war effort.  A victory ball was held for Jackson in Natchez at the end of the war.
5.1  Camp Jackson –  Just south of this site in 1813, Andrew Jackson established Camp Jackson, an encampment for the 2,070 Tennessee volunteers called to aid in the defense of the Gulf Coast.  The men trained here to prepare to meet the enemy in New Orleans.  In early March, Jackson received a letter from the War Department ordering him to dismiss his men in the field.  Jackson disobeyed the order and borrowed funds to return his men home.  That decision and the determination Jackson demonstrated on the return march earned Jackson the nickname “Old Hickory” (as in “tough as an old hickory tree”), a nickname which he later used to win the presidency.
8.0  Historic Jefferson College- (off parkway on Hwy. 61).  The site of Washington, the capital of the Mississippi Territory, and Fort Dearborn.  Mississippi dragoons mustered there in September, 1812.  Jackson’s troops camped there before moving to Camp Jackson.  British Prisoners of War from the Battle of New Orleans were housed there before being exchanged.  A victory ball was held for Jackson in Washington at the end of the war.
15.5  Mount Locust- In 1813, Natchez Expedition troops fell ill soon after departing Camp Jackson, and they made an emergency encampment at Selsertown, across from Mount Locust.  The Ferguson family tradition held that Jackson stayed in the house now known as “Mount Locust.”  In 1815, a hospital for infirm troops was established at Selsertown.  A victory ball for Jackson was held in nearby Greenville.
100.7 Choctaw Agency-  Troops camped near the agency complex on all marches.  In 1815, Jackson’s aide-de-camp purchased 200 horses from the agency for the return marches.  Choctaw Chief Pushmataha refused Shawnee Chief Tecumseh’s proposal to form an alliance against the Americans.  The Choctaw Nation supplied soldiers to serve under Jackson’s command in the Creek Wars,  at Pensacola, and at the Battle of New Orleans.
104.5  Brashears’ Stand- In 1814, a shortcut road was cut from the Natchez Road near this point as a direct route to Lake Pontchartrain and New Orleans.  Colonel Coffee attended courts martial at the stand in October, 1814.  In 1815,  about 300 infirm soldiers were  treated at the stand until they were well enough to march.  Six rooms were rented to physicians.
108.7  French Camp-  Louis LeFleur’s inn provided accommodations to detachments of soldiers, and some soldiers died at the inn. They were buried at French Camp.  The DAR marker on the parkway commemorates the site for its role in the War of 1812.
175.6  Cole Creek-  The swamp a Cole Creek is typical of the swamps troops encountered during the rainy winter and spring marches.  One wrote that they sometimes walked for miles in water up to their waists.
241.4  Chickasaw Agency – At  the Chickasaw Agency in 1813,  Colonel Coffee discovered that government contractors had not supplied food as planned.  Chickasaw Chief George Colbert drew on his nation’s winter food supply to feed the soldiers.  Coffee wrote, “I find that we shall want for nothing while traveling through the nation.”  Soldiers began to rely on the Colberts to provide corn for food for soldiers and horses.   On the 1813 return, the even greater number of soldiers began to run out of food.  When Jackson’s request for support from the Tennessee governor was denied, he wrote an angry reply about 13 miles south of the agency, “are these brave men…. to be left a pray (sic) to the Vultures…”  Nashville citizens borrowed funds to buy food for the soldiers.  They would be greeted with wagons loaded with food and horses near the Tennessee line.
261.8  Chickasaw Village Site-  Soldiers camped near the Chickasaw Old Town.  A second prong of the Natchez Road, built through Tennessee toward Fort Massac, intersected near this point.  Some returning soldiers formed separate detachments near this point and marched northwest along the new route.
283.3 Donivan Slough/Brown’s Bottom-  This wetland area challenged wagon travel on the road during wet seasons.  In 1815, wagons carrying food supplies south on the road to give relief to the soldiers could not pass Brown’s Bottom.  Soldiers often went hungry on the marches.
320.3  Buzzard Roost-  Chickasaw leader Levi Colbert maintained an inn at Buzzard Roost. Chickasaw tradition holds that Levi Colbert fought in the Battle of New Orleans.  It was near this point at the mouth of Bear Creek in spring 1812, Creek rebels brought Martha Crawley, a settler, as hostage from Tennessee.  George Colbert intervened with the Creeks to seek the rebels’ arrest. The incident spurred a war fever in Tennessee, and Tennessee federal legislators became part of the War Hawks to seek a proclamation of war.  In the 1813 southbound march, Coffee told his men at Bear Creek, “We are a band of brothers who are to share and share alike.”
327.3  Colbert Ferry-  Shawnee Chief Tecumseh met with the Chickasaw Chiefs at Colbert Ferry in 1811 to seek their alliance in a war on the Americans.  The Chickasaw king told Tecumseh that if his American friends died, he would die too.  Another counsel was held here in spring 1813 among the Chickasaws, Choctaws and Cherokees to determine which side they would support in the upcoming war.  Colbert made his friendship to the Americans clear.  Colbert ferried troops across the river throughout the war, and troops stayed at his inn.  In 1814, the U.S. Army occupied the ferry to defend it against a possible attack from Creek rebels.  Also in 1814, Colonel Coffee met with Levi Colbert here to recruit Chickasaw volunteers.  Chickasaw warriors joined the U.S. war effort and served to patrol the former Creek nation.
327.8  Tennessee River-  Crossing the Tennessee River was one of the primary challenges for the troop marches.  The small ferry accommodated only a few of the hundreds of troops at a time, and divided troops were more vulnerable to attack.  Colonel Coffee, who led the march of the cavalry in the 1813 expedition, and for whom this bridge is named, ordered troops arriving on the south side of the river to line their tents along the bank of the river, apparently to make it appear to potential attackers that the force was larger in number.
382.8  McLish’s Stand-  George Colbert’s son-in-law John McLish operated a inn for travelers and a mill at this site.  McLish provided food for soldiers.  On Jackson’s return in 1815, he stayed at McLish’s.  A postal road to Columbia intersected the Natchez Road at this point in 1812.
386  Grinder’s Inn-  A soldier on the return march in 1813 noted that the Chickasaw boundary was located about ten paces from the door of Robert Grinder’s cabin.  Once troops crossed that border, they had returned home.  Tennessee histories state that a number of troops were dismissed here, and some soldiers who did not survive the marches are buried here.  The returning soldier in 1813 recorded that his detachment enjoyed breakfast at Grinder’s Inn and then walked to Meriwether Lewis’s grave.
390.7  Dobbins Stand/Swan Creek-  Captain David Dobbins operated a stand near this point, where the 1808 Columbia Turnpike intersected the Natchez Road.  In 1813, the cavalry camped at Dobbins Stand on the southbound march and the men spent the evening shelling corn to provide food for their horses until they reached the Tennessee River.  Troops traveling east toward Columbia on the return likely exited the Natchez Road at this point.  Andrew Jackson traveled immediately to Columbia on the 1813 return to make arrangements to pay the troops.   A number of troops were dismissed in Columbia.
400.2  Sheboss/ Kegg Stand-  A widow maintained an inn at Kegg Springs.  Returning chaplain Learner Blackman wrote of her hospitality.
407.7  Gordon Ferry-  Captain John Gordon moved his family to this site in 1812 near the outbreak of war.  He was a military man, and he became the captain of Jackson’s Company of Spies.  He ferried about 5,000 Tennessee and Kentucky soldiers across the Duck River.  In 1814, when Jackson faced a mutiny of his volunteers, Gordon spoke first to quell the mutiny, and helped save Jackson’s career.  Gordon was sent as the sole spy into Pensacola.  The intelligence he reported led to Jackson’s invasion of Pensacola, which was then held by the Spanish.
426.3  War of 1812 Memorial-  This site is one of the largest War of 1812 memorials in the nation.    It was designated as the War of 1812 Memorial site on the bicentennial.  The stone wall separates the area from the parkway to provide a contemplative space.  The loop and walk lead to a preserved section of the old Natchez Road and a monument placed on the bicentennial of the War of 1812 by the U.S. Daughters of 1812.  The monument honors all soldiers who marched during the war and pays particular honor to those who did not survive the marches.  Soldiers are buried in unmarked graves along the old road.  As Jackson returned in 1815, the citizens of Franklin met him on the road and asked him to give a speech.  He proclaimed the meaning of the victory that foreign powers would henceforth respect the rights of Americans.
428.    Leiper’s Fork-  Originally known as Benton Town and Hillsboro, the town was founded along the Natchez Road by the mother of Jackson’s 1813 aide-de-camp Thomas Hart Benton.  The Benton home site is marked.  Benton or his brother shot Jackson (both claimed credit) in a brawl on the streets of Nashville soon after the 1813 return.  Jackson suffered the effects of the wound throughout the remainder of the war.  Benton served under Jackson again in 1814, and their friendship later renewed.  When Benton became a U.S. senator from Missouri, he cast an important vote against  President Jackson’s impeachment.
444.  Nashville-  The Natchez Road ran east of the terminus by the Belle Meade Plantation (off parkway on Hwy. 100).  The Belle Meade Planntation property contains the cbain that was Natchez Trace Post Rider Benjamin Joslin’s Natchez Trace stand, before it was sold to John Harding.  Cavalry marching south stopped at the stand and used the services of Harding’s blacksmith.  The December 10, 1812 rendezous of Andrew Jackson’s volunteer militia took place near the Broawday and Seventh Avenue area, and campsites stretched as far north as Sulphur Dell.  Jackson reviewed troops on the Public Square, and he spoke there on his return from the Natchez Expedition.  A victory dinner was held for Jackson at a tavern on the Public Square in 1815.

War of 1812 Bicentennial

IMG_0987The Natchez Trace Parkway was created, in part, to preserve the story of the Natchez Road in the War of 1812.  The military road built by the U.S. army provided for the movement of soldiers and supplies from the settled areas of Tennessee and Kentucky to the Gulf Coast.

Recognizing the need to protect access to ports in Natchez and New Orleans, President Thomas Jefferson instructed the military to build a federal wagon road along the old Natchez Trace in 1801. President Jefferson sent the first militia down the road in 1803 to ensure Spain’s acknowledgement of the Louisiana Purchase.

The road proved its utility when British forces threatened to invade New Orleans in 1812. General Andrew Jackson mustered volunteer militias.  Cavalry under the command of Colonel John Coffee marched down the Natchez Road to Fort Dearborn near Natchez.  Jackson’s troops were dismissed by the War Department, and he borrowed funds to return them home.  It was on that return journey that Jackson earned the name “Old Hickory.”

The road continued to be developed for military use.  A shortcut road was cut from theFlag-Raising1 Natchez Trace to Lake Pontchartrain above New Orleans.  During 1814, the Chickasaw and Choctaw nations supplied volunteers to aid the American war effort.   In fall 1814, when Jackson learned that the British were sailing toward the Gulf Coast with over 12,000 troops, he ordered fresh recruits be sent from Kentucky and Tennessee, and that they be marched down the Natchez Road to defend New Orleans.  Because of the difficulty the troops experienced in the marches in 1813, Jackson’s aid-de-camp made a late decision to send most of the recruits to New Orleans by river; however, detachments of cavalry marched down the Natchez Road toward New Orleans.

The decisive Battle of New Orleans and the war itself forged a new American spirit and led to the settlement of what became the American South.  Many of the officers in that battle became southern political leaders, and the victory propelled Jackson to the White House.

The Association  has partnered with the National Park Service and the 7th U.S.Living History Association to  commemorate the War of 1812. We are telling the story of the Natchez Trace and the years when those who lived near it were called on to defend their homes. The information we gather and the programs we create will last beyond the bicentennial to become a permanent part of the information available to visitors. The stories of heroism and sacrifice in what has been called the “forgotten war,” will serve as a catalyst to give new life to the history of the Natchez Trace and a better understanding of the important role it played in the independence and development of the United States.

For more information on upcoming and past events, click on the War of 1812 Bicentennial tab again and select the Events box that will appear to the right.

For more history about the War of 1812, including highlights for a driving tour, click on the “More History- War of 1812 Bicentennial” tab on the right.